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Week 3 - Martin Luther King Day

Up until the 1960s, African Americans in some states of the United States could not vote in elections. There were separate sections for African Americans on public transport, parks, restaurants and even separate toilets. In some states, African-American children were denied an education or had to go to separate schools from their white peers. These schools were often poorly funded and equipped. African Americans were usually in badly paid work and lived in the poorest areas. Some African American adults and children were killed, beaten up, threatened and wrongfully put in prison.
Martin Luther King was a Christian who was determined to make sure that all Americans had the same rights regardless of their race.
In 1963, he led a huge march on Washington, D.C., the US capital. Here, in front of a crowd of 250,000 people, King made his famous “I have a dream” speech. Here is a short extract: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character .”
 

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